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health care

roadskater's picture

Health Care Done Well Various Ways in the United States of America

I don't care to get too political here, because I'm not going to change your mind about anything, and you're not so likely to change anyone else's, perhaps. Everyone has their views, but here's one view from someone who has lived around the world and now lives back in the US, back in the US, back in the USA.

Take it with whatever grain or block of salt or poison you'd like, but...

I found it inspiring...

to hear that there are some people in the United States of America trying to find ways to bring the most and best care per dollar to everyone who needs it, in an effort to reduce the costs to all and improve the care to all. There are so many saying we can not do it. It is nice to hear some people are trying...and doing.

http://video.pbs.org/video/2198039605/

roadskater's picture

Of Course a Fatigued Brain Might Just Want to Give Up and Stop Skating or Cycling Sooner

This article reminds us of some simple ideas but with some testing to back it up. Even in sports requiring lots of sprinting, there are moments that depend on endurance. In roadskating and roadcycling, that's certainly true, especially in the distances we love, some of us. The basic idea was to test whether watching relatively neutral documentary shows vs. taking a fairly mentally tough test would produce an effect on subsequent endurance athletic tests.

Although the cognitive test didn’t produce any physical fatigue, the volunteers gave up on the cycling test 15 per cent sooner when they were mentally fatigued compared to when they had simply watched the documentaries.

So I'm OK to watch some PBS before long distance workouts it seems.

roadskater's picture

Sports Medicine: Science or Celebrity

I'm not sure about access to this article for everyone, but the New York Times had an interesting piece on sports medicine, a booming segment of health care, and one in which roadskaters and roadcyclists are definitely interested. But how do we know there's real science behind the treatments and techniques on offer? The article is interesting on multiple levels, since the author received one of the treatments and wrote about it in an earlier article referenced within.

Fortunately, some people out there are trying to do the follow-up, but most of us wanna be like mike or whatever, so we are susceptible to celebrity ads or buzz. Anyway, not much to say, except this article seems worth a read as background for life on the road. I"m interested in others' thoughts and experiences. I'm certainly not saying that sports medicine has nothing to offer, but like most things that involve hope and money, it's hard to know what's real. 

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